Imagine yourself in a colossal stadium, with a ceiling that reaches the sky, but in front of you is an endless winding of walls and corners, straight paths, open paths, curvy paths, going on and on. Right when you start to get a grip on which way to go, that’s when a wall appears, it’s a dead-end, and you have to turn back, forced to back-track your steps.

That is today’s opportunist in the labyrinth of technology.

Not everyone acknowledges the problem. Some can afford the lifestyle of buying and upgrading every year; subscribing to this, subscribing to that; paying a little here, paying a little there; then the labyrinth can be walked around, not through. But for those short on cash in an extended measure of time, you see the problem.

There are also ones who confidently smile when you call them “Nerds!”, for they see no trouble in troubleshooting every malfunction a computer has; taking the computer apart when it shuts down and won’t power on; patiently working with the blue-screened-computer which expresses an apology with a giant frowny face; for those people, the problem is a puzzle for them to master. Those proudly known as nerds valiantly organize their 100 passwords in one place, keep backups of every file, and budget in cloud storage, subscriptions, better speakers, newest upgrades, and the best hardware, barely having money for anything else. Which is why I will argue, even they might acknowledge there is a problem in the labyrinth of technology.

Exactly one week after I told my readers and viewers, in a video, to be prepared to lose their technology, my most reliable hard-drive died. I don’t mean the keydrive that broke a while ago, the one that was new and barely used. That one was where our Jabber Worthy files were saved. The hard-drive I’m talking about today was our main network: we had all our files saved there, and I had a shared hard-drive between our two computers, Kat and mine. Not only was that our favorite, most reliable hard-drive, it was the one we’ve had for years, which I guess is part of the problem. It “wore out”. It’s not exactly like a teddy bear, where it keeps being cute even after it wears out…

The sort of good news is, I found out my hard-drive may be fixable within a $300-$800 range, the may be part of my sentence emphasized. But since my money is better spent on new equipment, since everything is older than my hard-drive that crashed, it could be better to count the losses as a lesson learned and pick up the pieces, finding the unorganized backups scattered across the maze of computer storages. We’ll start anew if we have to. Luckily, we are the meticulous (and paranoid?) types, and God is good, so much of the most important files are safe.

At what point does losing your life’s work develop into some form of PTSD…? After we chose career as our top importance, sacrificing a lot for talents and dreams, when can we say that our losses have become our scars?

We are blessed though. Kat got a new laptop last week, replacing her 11-year-old desktop one. The laptop arrived just in time for her to type a new and improved rules of our pirate-themed Jabber Worthy game. It’s so much better… We’re trying! Some say we never give up. They’re probably right.

Luckily, Kat and I printed out the cards to Jabber Worthy years ago and so we still have hard copies of our game and rules, but we will most likely try to give it a fresh look now that our files have been lost two different times. At one point you realize God might be trying to teach you a new thing. I pray for Him to work on our hearts and help us take the windy course to success, not the dead-end course to failure. I guess that’s why we innovate!

Computer (sneak peak Jabberworthy) 2

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